7
Nov

Asthma In Single Parent Family

Asthma Wrose in Single Parent Family Homes

Asthma Worse in Single Parent Family Homes

Single Parent Family Homes

Asthma is worse in single parent family homes.  This past Saturday, the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center presented a study that revealed that children in single parent families are 50% more likely to return for hospital care of their asthma than children in two parent homes.  The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) annual meeting in Boston had a presentation regarding tis finding. 

The study also revealed that children were more likely to return for hospital care for their asthma, if their family's annual income was less than $60,000 a year.

 

Children with Asthma Need Family Support

This study, presented at the ACAAI annual meeting, has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal.  Therefore, this is a preliminary report.  However, pediatricians see this every day; there is a definite socioeconomic impact on childhood disease.  In general, single-parent families are more overwhelmed and have less of an income than two-parent families.  Who is there to take turns when it comes to missing work, administering medications, and catching up on much needed sleep when caring for a sick child?  This is yet another reminder that single parent families need more support.  Support can come from other family members, friends, and in some cases the employer.  Inevitably, where there is more parental support, the child with a chronic disease is healthier.

For more information, go to http://bit.ly/rF1NGI & on single-parent families, go to http://bit.ly/toBaiG.

7
Nov

Kids Not Receiving Pneumonia Vaccine

Only 37% of children between the ages 14 and 59 months have received the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13).  This alarming statistic was released on November 4, 2011 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.
 
PCV13 replaces the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).  Current recommendations include that: 1) children receive a primary series of PCV13 and 2) children between ages 14 and 59 months who have previously received the PCV7 as their primary series, receive a supplemental dose of PCV13, in order to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD).  Essentially, PCV13 protects children against an additional 6 strains of pneumococcus infection.
 
Pneumococcus is a bacterial infection that can cause invasive disease, such as pneumonia, sepsis, and/or meningitis, which can result in severe illness and/or death.  Parents are usually familiar with & doctors typically refer to this vaccine as one of the "pneumonia" vaccines.
 
If your child is less than 5 years old, please ask your kids' doctor if they are due for PCV13.  It could prevent illness & even save their lives.  For more information regarding kids and this pneumonia vaccine, PCV13, please go to http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/pneumo/default.htm#vacc.
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