13
May

Banned From the Prom | High School Punishment

James Tate had a unique way to invite Sonali Rodrigues to the prom; he and his friends posted large letters to the wall at his high school entrance. Romantic? Fun? Maybe. Banned from the prom? Yes.

He received an in-school suspension for his antics. However, his high school's policy is that any suspension results in a punishment such that the offending student is banned from the prom. People are stating that the punishment does not fit the crime.

This has hit the media in a firestorm. #teamtate is on twitter. Facebook pages have been created. James and Sonali have been interviewed by the “Today” show and on “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” It is interesting to me that the parents don't seem to get interviewed. Just James, Sonali, and his friends have received national media attention. What about the parents? What are their thoughts? What did they discuss with their son after the incident occurred? Schools are responsible for helping develop character in their students. However, parents are still primary in this arena. It's almost as if parenting is even considered. This can be such a learning tool for so many teenagers out there. Expectations, rules, character development, social media, and so much more can be discussed with our teens from this one simple case.

Now, Connecticut State Rep. Jason Perillo and State Rep. Sean Williams are "drafting legislation that would allow school administrations, along with the parents and the student, to create a community-service option to determine the best course of discipline." While this is noble, I can't believe a law is necessary for this. Why can't the local PTA, the school board, or school district leaders make school discipline in general an issue to discuss? No. Apparently, a state law is this answer.

I think there is something more important that is being missed here; the school, parents, and students, need to communicate. There needs to be a forum in which the schools principles and parenting skills are equally appreciated. Perhaps the answer is that local school officials or the school district officials sit down with parents and students with the purpose of composing a set list of disciplinary measures applicable to various different infractions.

See Shelton High School’s press conference yesterday in which they discussed suspension and punishment of being banned from the prom at http://morningjournal.com/articles/2011/05/13/news/doc4dcd436742218052531228.txt

13
May

Change in Tylenol Dosing | Standard & Safety in Tylenol Measurement

Starting this summer, Tylenol will now have standardized dosing for their Infants' & Children's products. In 2009, the FDA made several safety recommendations, including changing the concentration of Tylenol so that it is unform regardless of the age of the child. That's precisely what they've done. As a result, the measuring devices will also change. The current concentrated Infant's Tylenol will cease to be manufactured.

The idea behind this standard concentration is to decrease the risk of overdosing a child. In this case, safety and standardization go hand in hand. An overdose of Tylenol can result in liver damage and/or death. This change is particularly helpful if you have children of various ages in your home. When exhausted in the care of your sick child, you will no longer risk choosing the wrong bottle (i.e. the wrong concentration) in the store or at home. Hence, your child is less likely to be overdosed or even underdosed.

This will have an impact if/when you choose to give your child Tylenol. It also will have an impact when you ask your child's Pediatrician for dosing questions. Why? Because both past & new formulations will be available in the market at the same time. So, your child's doctor will need to know the concentration of the specific bottle you have at home in order to tell you what dosage of Tylenol is appropriate for your child. In reality it won't be a big deal. But it is best to be prepared, as there is likely to be some confusion until all of the old formulations are truly a thing of the past.

On May 4, 2011, The Consumer Healthcare Produscts Association announced that other manufacturers of Acetaminophen (generic Tylenol) will also change their formulations so that their concentrations will also standardized to 160 mg/5 ml.

For more information regarding the change in Tylenol concentration and measurement, please go to http://www.chpa-info.org/

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